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SPEED LIMIT #1 – ROTTERDAM – 2008

Self adhesive plastic was used to change traffic signs. It questions the ability of individual citizens to

influence laws and regulations.

 

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SPEED LIMIT #8 – AMSTERDAM – 2009

Self adhesive plastic was used to change traffic signs. It questions the ability of individual citizens to

influence laws and regulations.

 

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SPEED LIMIT #7 – AMSTERDAM – 2009

Self adhesive plastic was used to change traffic signs. It questions the ability of individual citizens to

influence laws and regulations.

 

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BOY PLAYING FOOTBALL – ROTTERDAM – 2001

A young boy playing soccer on a traffic island on a busy road.

 

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RESTORING – DEN HAAG – 2007

Restoring a pedestrian crossing with everyday household paint.

 

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DECORATING – DEN HAAG – 2003

A woman tries to make a children’s playground security fence more festive.

 

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PUBLIC SCULPTURE – AMSTERDAM – 2009

A sculpture is placed in a working class neighbourhood in Amsterdam.

 

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FLOWERS – AMERSFOORT – 1998

Harmen de Hoop laid flowers at the base of this sculpture.
As if to commemorate a forgotten war.

 

ARMY CARS – AMERSFOORT – 1998

In cooperation with the Dutch army eight army vehicles were parked in a poor neighbourhood.
Placed in relation to nearby green balconies and the sculpture of an archer.

 

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GROWING MARIJUANA – ROTTERDAM – 2016

Cannabis seeds were sown in front of a police station.

 

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NEW NATURE – ROTTERDAM – 2016

Oak trees for Rotterdam: dozens of acorns planted on a traffic island (waiting for them to grow).

 

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ARTIFICIAL PLANTS REPLACED – ROTTERDAM – 2004

Artificial plants taken from inside a university library and placed in pre-dug holes outside.

 

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ANIMAL LIBERATION FRONT #1 – HOLLAND – 2007

An Animal Liberation Front supporter buys a snake in a pet shop and sets it free in its ‘natural’ habitat.

 

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ANIMAL LIBERATION FRONT #2 – HOLLAND – 2007

An Animal Liberation Front supporter buys a tropical fish in a pet shop and sets it free in its ‘natural’ habitat.

 

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ANIMAL LIBERATION FRONT #3 – HOLLAND – 2007

An Animal Liberation Front supporter buys a bearded dragon in a pet shop and sets it free in its ‘natural’ habitat.

 

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ANIMAL LIBERATION FRONT #4 – HOLLAND – 2007

An Animal Liberation Front supporter buys a rat in a pet shop and sets it free in its ‘natural’ habitat.

 

FETCHING WATER #2 – YANGSHOU, CHINA – 2006

Two women fetching water in front of their house.

 

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WATERING TREES – WALVIS BAY – 2001

A woman waters dead trees in the centre of Walvis Bay, Namibia.

 

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PERMANENT EDUCATION #2 – STAVANGER – 2015

Jan Ubøe (Mathematics and Statistics Professor, Norwegian School Of Economics) gave a 30-minute lecture on the streets of Stavanger on the subject of option pricing. The equations – written in chalk on a public wall acting as a surrogate blackboard – were intended as a form of ‘knowledge propaganda’. Professor Ubøe explained to the public how banks can eliminate risk when they issue options and how banks (by trading continuously in the market) can meet their obligations no matter what happens. The option price is the minimum amount of money that a bank needs to carry out such a strategy. While the core argument is perfectly sound, it has an interesting flaw. If the market suddenly makes a jump, i.e. reacts so fast that the bank does not have sufficient time to reposition its assets, the bank will be exposed to risk. This flaw goes a long way to explain the devastating financial crisis in 2008.